Tuesday, 15 April 2014

Amazing Arrow Trick

A trick you can do at home. I won't tell you what it is, just take a look.



YouTube link

(thanks Cora)

Super Planet Crash


Super Planet Crash is a little game by University of Texas astronomer Dr. Stefano Meschiari. The main goal of the game is to make a planetary system of your own creation be stable (i.e. no planet is ejected, or collides with another body).

The challenge is to fit as many massive bodies as possible inside 2 AUs (twice the distance between the Earth and the Sun), teetering close to instability but lasting at least 500 years. Accordingly, the game rewards a daring player with more points (proportionally to the mass of each body added to the system).

Deluxe Twin Coffin Set


That's OK then.

(via Bad Newspaper)

The Most Hated Sounds In The World


Although most of us need to use some kind of an alarm clock, most people admit how much they hate hearing the sound of their alarm going off in the morning. But is your alarm clock's alarm sound really one of the most hated sounds in the world?

Using brain imaging, a study from University College London found that the amygdala is responsible for adjusting emotional responses to unpleasant noises. It sends a sort of distress signal to the auditory cortex, which is the part of the brain responsible for processing sound. Here are the 10 most hated sounds in the world and the top 4 sounds humans like most.

(thanks Lee)

The Kelpies

The Kelpies is a time-lapse short film by award winning filmmaker Walid Salhab. The Kelpies are 30 metre high horse-head sculptures, standing next to a new extension to the Forth and Clyde Canal in The Helix, a new parkland project built to connect 16 communities in the Falkirk Council Area, Scotland.

The sculptures were designed by sculptor Andy Scott and were completed in October 2013. The Kelpies are a monument to horse powered heritage across Scotland.



Vimeo link

(thanks Cora)

Daily Cartoon

Dan Rosandich is an American cartoonist. Dan's cartoons have appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, National Review, The National Enquirer, Science Digest, Reader's Digest and Woman's World. The Presurfer, in cooperation with Dan Rosandich, will bring you a cartoon every day.

The Cave City Of Vardzia

image credit: Tony Bowden

The Cave City of Vardzia is remarkable. Situated in the European country of Georgia at the juncture of Eastern Europe and Western Asia it has an over eight hundred year history. Yet you would be forgiven for wondering why such a place was built in the first place. The words why and how spring immediately to mind.

Monday, 14 April 2014

Parametric Expression

A study of quantified emotion. The music and culture platform Subbacultcha! and Pllant/Marieke van Helden extended their exploration of talent to the visual realm, merging musical performances with the visual expressions of local artists into full experiential environments.



Vimeo link

(via Everlasting Blort)

Which Dewey Decimal Category Are You?

The Dewey Decimal Classification is a proprietary library classification system first published in the United States by Melvil Dewey in 1876. The Decimal Classification introduced the concepts of relative location and relative index which allow new books to be added to a library in their appropriate location based on subject.

Ever wonder what it would be like to become a book? Where would you be in the library? Which Dewey Decimal number would you be given? Take this quiz to find out. I got the 000's.

An And Ria's First Flight


Doing things for the first time keeps the world interesting. It helps us progress and discover. But there has to be someone who's prepared to step over the edge.

With Vodafone's help, two elderly Dutch women (Ria who is 78 and An who is 71) take a leap of faith and board their first flight. An first has to overcome her fear of flying. Watch these two grannies board the plane and have an adventure that will have you laughing right along with them.

(thanks Cora)

Don't Look Down: The Real Mad Men Of New York Advertising

Imagine strapping in, clipping on, and jumping off the roof of a building - every day. In an age with digital marketing on every platform, there are those who still get out messages the old-fashioned way, with a paintbrush and some attitude.

They call themselves 'wall dogs,' because they are chained to a wall all day by a safety harness. Vocatib spent a day with these blue-collar artists as they paint advertisements high above the streets of New York City.



YouTube link

(via 22 Words)

30 Highest Rated And Most Affordable Online Colleges In The U.S.

image credit

Earning a college education can be expensive. Luckily, there are schools that offer degrees at exceptionally reasonable prices. Studying online shouldn't mean a sacrifice in terms of quality, either, as many of these colleges provide top-ranked courses and award-winning teaching.

Best of all, perhaps, a lot of online programs are extremely flexible; in other words, completing a degree can be fitted around work and personal commitments, regardless of geographical location. Here are 30 of the highest rated and most affordable online colleges in the U.S.

Daily Cartoon

Dan Rosandich is an American cartoonist. Dan's cartoons have appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, National Review, The National Enquirer, Science Digest, Reader's Digest and Woman's World. The Presurfer, in cooperation with Dan Rosandich, will bring you a cartoon every day.

Monday Puzzle

The Presurfer, in cooperation with pzzlr.com, brings you a puzzle every Monday. Just to tickle your brain.

Words or phrases which read the same backwards as forwards are called palindromes (e.g. refer, civic, racecar). The answer to each of the following clues is a palindrome (e.g. canine deity = dog god).

1. where I work out
2. layer felines
3. best location
4. take on loan or take without asking?

You can find the answer here.

Sunday, 13 April 2014

Mystery Solved: Why Flies Are So Hard to Swat?

image credit

Why are buzzing flies so hard to swat? It's a question that’s vexed humankind for millennia, but scientists may finally have the answer. Flies on the wing react to looming threats as if they were fighter jets - by banking away in a fraction of the blink of an eye, according to a study published in the journal Science.

Too fast for the swat, the airborne insects harness their aerodynamic force within a wingbeat or two to almost instantaneously change their course. This happens so quickly - in less than one hundredth of a second - that scientists required three high-speed cameras, each able to take 7,500 frames per second, to capture it.

19 Food Brand Names You're Probably Pronouncing Wrong

How do you pronounce Sriracha again? Popsugar food expert Brandi Milloy and Foodbeast janitor Elie Ayrouth can help you pronounce things right.



YouTube link

(thanks Cora)

The Untold Story Of The First Woman To Fly Around The World

image credit

Geraldine 'Jerrie' Fredritz Mock (born 1925 in Newark, Ohio) was the first woman to fly solo around the world. She would fly a single engine Cessna 180 christened the 'Spirit of Columbus.' The trip began March 19, 1964, in Columbus, Ohio, and ended there April 17, 1964.

Jerrie Mock was 38 years at the time and she accomplished what Amelia Earhart is famous for having failed to do. But in the decades since, as Mock's life began to unravel, history all but forgot the pilot who made it.

Guelta d'Archei: Sahara's Famous Water Source

image credit

A guelta is a peculiar type of wetland, typical of desert regions. Gueltas are formed when underground water in lowland depressions spills to the surface and creates permanent pools and reservoirs.

The Guelta Archei is a hidden treasure in the Sahara due to its scenic beauty and function. Located in the Ennedi Plateau, in north-eastern Chad, south-east of the town of Fada, this wetland serves as a popular rest stop for nomads who've been traveling the desert for days.

Daily Cartoon

Dan Rosandich is an American cartoonist. Dan's cartoons have appeared in the Saturday Evening Post, National Review, The National Enquirer, Science Digest, Reader's Digest and Woman's World. The Presurfer, in cooperation with Dan Rosandich, will bring you a cartoon every day.

The 1900 Paris World's Fair In Color Photos

image credit

The Exposition Universelle of 1900 was a world's fair held in Paris, France, from April to November 1900, to celebrate the achievements of the past century and to accelerate development into the next. The style that was universally present in the Exposition was Art Nouveau.

The Paris World's Fair, visited by nearly 50 million people, displayed many machines, inventions, and architecture that are now nearly universally known, including the Grande Roue de Paris Ferris wheel, Russian nesting dolls, diesel engines, talking films, escalators, and the telegraphone.

(via Everlasting Blort)